The Council of Elrond

The Council of Elrond

Today I thought I’d share another of my favourite parts of The Lord of the Rings in an audio recording.

The two excerpts I’ve chosen are from the first of the three volumes, The Fellowship of the Ring, and concern the great council held at the elven fortress of Rivendell on the 25th October in the 3018th year of the Third Age of Middle-earth; more commonly known as the Council of Elrond. Though there were many other topics discussed at this meeting of elves, dwarves and men, by far the most pertinent of these was the fate of the One Ring, which had been brought to Rivendell by the hobbit Frodo Baggins.

In the first of the excerpts, Boromir of Gondor tells the council of the prophetic dream which had led him on the long journey into the north to attend the council of which he knew not the purpose.

The second excerpt comes a little later on, when the ranger Strider reveals himself to be Aragorn, the heir of Isildur. The steward’s son Boromir is dubious of his claim. The ranger’s old friend Bilbo Baggins then steps forward in annoyance to recite a poem which is one of Tolkien’s most beloved and well-known pieces of verse.

Read on…

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The Departure of Boromir

The Departure of Boromir

The following is a recording of myself reading from one of my favourite parts of The Lord of the Rings.

The Departure of Boromir is, in my opinion, the saddest part of the whole trilogy. Those who haven’t read the books will perhaps not be entirely familiar with this beautiful and melancholic passage, which can be found in the first chapter of The Two Towers.

Aragorn, Legolas and Gimli come across Boromir, lying among the woods upon Amon Hen. The son of the steward has fallen to the hands of the cruel Uruk-hai in a valiant effort to protect his charges, the hobbits Merry and Pippin; the great horn he carried split in two. In their grief, the three place the fallen Boromir into a boat with his shield and horn and the swords of his enemies at his feet. Then follows Tolkien’s most elegaic poetry; the song of the three winds, which Aragorn and Legolas sing as they send their companion out on his final journey.

Read on…


The Real Reason Saruman Is No Longer White

The Real Reason Saruman Is No Longer White

[Scene – The Tower of Orthanc. Saruman is using his palantir to make a much needed clothing purchase, but is having some problems. He paces around impatiently. Cheesy music fills the chamber.]

Music: – Oh! won’t you come back to me, my love, the mushrooms are getting cold. The days are so blue, I’m missing you, and the pipeweed is growing mould. Oh! –

Auto-voice: – I am sorry, all of our palantiri are busy at present. Please hold, your call is important to us. –

[Saruman looks up at this in expectation, but rolls his eyes as the music resumes. Some minutes later, a splutter is heard on the line, and he rushes to the palantir.]

Salesperson: Hello, Lothlorien Robemakers! My name is Ailawen! How may I help you today?

Saruman: Hello, I would like to make an order please.

Read on…


The Star of Eärendil / I Galad Eärendil

The Star of Eärendil / I Galad Eärendil

Morning comes, yet all is dark
Over the plain of the Pellenor Fields
Rohan has emptied its men and its steeds
Noble men riding against evil
And in a dark cave in the Morgul Vale
Eärendil’s star shines into the black

Under the shadow, mist and despair
The flagging hopes of mankind
Under the sun, the battle finished
Let kin asundered be apart no more
For in a dark where all lights go out
Eärendil’s light has come again

Read on…


The Hobbit’s Riddle-book

The Hobbit's Riddle-book

Just a quick post today for all you LOTR Purists out there who want to prove themselves!

I hereby challenge you to the time-honoured contest of riddles; with a twist! I love riddle games, as all with hobbitish tendencies do, and I’ve written a good few that I’d like to share with you. All the answers to my riddles are found in either The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings or The Silmarillion.

Feel free to leave your guesses as comments here and leave your e-mail address if you would like me to mail you the answers! Highlight the text where it says ‘clue’ for a handy hint.

Read on…


The Elf Said What?!?!

The Elf Said What?!?!

Now that there’s a new Lord of the Rings film firmly on the horizon, I thought it was high time to be geeky again!

There are, in my eyes, two different kinds of LOTR geek. First, you have ‘the Purist’, and then you have what’s known as ‘the Ringer’. Ringers (like Trekkies) are fans who love the films and indulge in all-nighter bumper viewings of all the extended versions back-to-back, but perhaps haven’t read the books themselves. Purists are the kind of fan who won’t touch the films with a barge pole, on account of the grave departures in plot or character from the original books. Purists look down on Ringers as lacking some sort of intelligence, and Ringers think that Purists are a bit snobbish, actually.

It’s perhaps a bit ironic that I’m a bit of both. I love the film adaptations of the books, in spite of all their idiosyncrasies and deliberate differences from the original books. I believe both are amazing masterpieces in their own right. Although, it’s true that a very impractical part of me still laments the loss of Tom Bombadil. It also wonders why Elrond, one of the most important Elves in Middle-earth, travelled unaccompanied for thousands of miles just to give Aragorn a sword – when he could’ve avoided the journey completely by handing it over back in Rivendell. As he did in the book.

Read on…


The Hobbit, Gollum and Why I’m Excited

The Hobbit, Gollum and Why I'm Excited

…and if you’ve been keeping up with the news and gossip surrounding the long-awaited film adaptation of J. R. R. Tolkien’s beloved first book, you should be too!

It’s no secret that I am a huge, huge fan of all things Lord of the Rings; the original Lord of the Rings novels, the film adaptations directed by the amazing Peter Jackson… even the MMO The Lord of the Rings Online. However, my first adventures in the lands of Middle-earth began a long time ago. Like many readers before and since, they began with a strange little man called Bilbo.

Read on…