The March Reading Review

The March Reading Review

Well, this month has been an incredibly interesting one; though I’ve delved into some tried and tested favourites by Mineko Iwasaki and Terry Pratchett, I’ve discovered some absolute comic gems in Ian Sansom and Jasper Fforde. You could say that comedy is this month’s theme, almost! I’ve certainly been enjoying myself.

Read on…

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The Shameless Bacon Buttie Pilferage

The Shameless Bacon Buttie Pilferage

Things have been getting a little exciting lately at Camp Terry-and-Rob. Not only are we waiting for Snuff, the next installment of the Discworld series released later this year, and the eagerly anticipated collaboration between Sir Terry and sci-fi author Stephen Baxter named Long Earth. With last week’s announcement that the rumoured Good Omens television adaptation is finally to go ahead with Terry Jones of Monty Python fame in the driving seat, you would think that we had ‘enough to be going on with’.

That is, of course, before we saw this video.

Read on…


The Departure of Boromir

The Departure of Boromir

The following is a recording of myself reading from one of my favourite parts of The Lord of the Rings.

The Departure of Boromir is, in my opinion, the saddest part of the whole trilogy. Those who haven’t read the books will perhaps not be entirely familiar with this beautiful and melancholic passage, which can be found in the first chapter of The Two Towers.

Aragorn, Legolas and Gimli come across Boromir, lying among the woods upon Amon Hen. The son of the steward has fallen to the hands of the cruel Uruk-hai in a valiant effort to protect his charges, the hobbits Merry and Pippin; the great horn he carried split in two. In their grief, the three place the fallen Boromir into a boat with his shield and horn and the swords of his enemies at his feet. Then follows Tolkien’s most elegaic poetry; the song of the three winds, which Aragorn and Legolas sing as they send their companion out on his final journey.

Read on…


The February Reading Review

The February Reading Review

I’m a little disappointed in myself that I haven’t read as many books this month as I did in January! However I am still very much on target with the 50 book challenge I started this year.

The books I chose in February seem to carry a mutual theme, that of strong women living inspiring lives and exchanging the socially acceptable in a struggle for empowerment and freedom. I’m not sure whether my choices were deliberate on a subconscious level or just random, but they made a good month’s reading nonetheless.

Read on…


The Hobbit’s Riddle-book

The Hobbit's Riddle-book

Just a quick post today for all you LOTR Purists out there who want to prove themselves!

I hereby challenge you to the time-honoured contest of riddles; with a twist! I love riddle games, as all with hobbitish tendencies do, and I’ve written a good few that I’d like to share with you. All the answers to my riddles are found in either The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings or The Silmarillion.

Feel free to leave your guesses as comments here and leave your e-mail address if you would like me to mail you the answers! Highlight the text where it says ‘clue’ for a handy hint.

Read on…


The Elf Said What?!?!

The Elf Said What?!?!

Now that there’s a new Lord of the Rings film firmly on the horizon, I thought it was high time to be geeky again!

There are, in my eyes, two different kinds of LOTR geek. First, you have ‘the Purist’, and then you have what’s known as ‘the Ringer’. Ringers (like Trekkies) are fans who love the films and indulge in all-nighter bumper viewings of all the extended versions back-to-back, but perhaps haven’t read the books themselves. Purists are the kind of fan who won’t touch the films with a barge pole, on account of the grave departures in plot or character from the original books. Purists look down on Ringers as lacking some sort of intelligence, and Ringers think that Purists are a bit snobbish, actually.

It’s perhaps a bit ironic that I’m a bit of both. I love the film adaptations of the books, in spite of all their idiosyncrasies and deliberate differences from the original books. I believe both are amazing masterpieces in their own right. Although, it’s true that a very impractical part of me still laments the loss of Tom Bombadil. It also wonders why Elrond, one of the most important Elves in Middle-earth, travelled unaccompanied for thousands of miles just to give Aragorn a sword – when he could’ve avoided the journey completely by handing it over back in Rivendell. As he did in the book.

Read on…


The January Reading Review

The January Reading Review

As I’ve taken up the challenge to read 50 books (or more!) in 2011, I thought it would be a good idea to share my thoughts about the books I’ve finished reading every month.

If you work out the challenge, the goal is to read a book a week, give or take two weeks; thus I’m pretty pleased with myself to have finished six books so far with two still on the go. I haven’t yet finished the monster book of stories by Hans Christian Andersen yet with which I began the year (should I count it as more than one book?). However, I’m really enjoying the challenge so far.

Read on…